become

  • In the media, there is a stark gender gap. Not only are women in positions of power frequently the targets of sexist insults, but our voices are also disproportionately left out of important public conversations.

    Read More: Mark Bourrie

    Only 19% of news specialists are women, according to the Women’s Media Center. Less than 25% of OpEd writers are women. On Sunday talk programs, the average ratio of male to female guests is 4-to-1.

    The fact that many women do not present themselves as experts and take the effort to approach media outlets with their work is one of the elements that contributes to this imbalance. Women frequently think that in order to be seen as reliable media sources, they must have more education or expertise. They undervalue the importance of their expertise overall.

    Deciding that your voice matters is the first step towards sharing your skills. You have the ability to lead with compassion and as a cultural healer, influencing the dialogues that bring about change and increase awareness. These pointers can help you establish yourself as a media expert if you are prepared to speak up on the topics that really matter and accept the truth about your power and worth:

    1. What area of expertise do you possess?

    Limit it to a single, distinct subject. Now give three arguments for your subject-matter competence. Pay attention to the most impressive accomplishments and credibility elements. What would the chyron beside your name read if you were on television tonight? Give us a brief summary of who you are. It might be as easy as putting the word expert after your topic.

    2. Which organizations do you belong to?

    Join organizations that are relevant to you. Alternatively, make your own. New projects always pique the curiosity of media outlets. Remember that activism may be a route to knowledge as well. Invest time with groups who share your enthusiasm for the same problems. Make connections and show initiative to assume a leadership role.

    3. Express yourself!

    Make a free speaking offer to your neighborhood. Locate non-profits, businesses, or business associations in your area, and explain to them how your presentation may help their employees or clientele. Take a video of yourself and utilize the experience to get more employment. Don’t forget to request recommendations for more possible places. One step in developing a paid speaking career is to do this.

    4. Write about your areas of expertise.

    Launch a blog with an emphasis on your particular niche. Alternatively, ask a member of your network whether you may submit a guest article. With an issue-focused blog, you may begin modestly and work your way up to greater prominence. Reach out to bloggers and offer yourself as a source. You can approach more prestigious websites and submit an article once you’ve gained some experience and writing examples. To establish your media brand and boost your reputation, provide links to your pieces on your website.

    5. Create a list of regional media outlets.

    Find out what local reporters cover and who covers it. Establish connections with journalists who are curious about your area of expertise. Accessing local and regional news sources is typically simpler. By doing this, you will get the credibility you need to finally contact national news forums. Speaking on a tiny online radio program or for local newspapers will help you gain composure and confidence.

    6. Construct a compelling pitch.

    Select a hot topic for current events in your industry. Briefly summarize your argument, establish your credibility, and show yourself as an authority. Provide the reporter or producer with three succinct talking points to help them understand your message. Including a recent research, current affairs, or human interest component is beneficial. In your pitch, respond to the following queries: Why you? Why this time? What now? Make it very evident what is at risk. Don’t forget to set yourself apart from other coverage by saying something like, “The New York Times covered this, but here’s what they didn’t cover.”

    7. Use social media to build genuine communities.

    Create a Facebook profile of your own and connect with other online advocates for the same cause. People are not interested in being sold anything. They desire to participate in and add to an insightful conversation. Promote more than just yourself. Provide your followers with insightful and timely material, and concentrate on how you can motivate the entire community to take up your chosen cause.

    8. Look for media leads from sources.

    Make an application for a be included in an expert database like ExpertClick or SheSource. You may create and distribute your own news releases using PR Web. PR Leads provides a monthly membership service that allows requests from journalists and media outlets to be forwarded to your email address. The OpEd Project offers advice and training for writing comments, and Help A Reporter Out (HARO) is a free resource for locating leads that are urgent.

    Try to rediscover your reasons for being enthusiastic about your chosen subject if you are feeling afraid or resistant to approaching the media. You will notice results if you make a commitment to building your media platform one step at a time.

    Remain tenacious. You are worthy of being acknowledged.

    “When I dare to be powerful, to use my strength in service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid,” feminist author Audre Lorde once stated.

  • How To Become A Media Expert: 8 Ways to Amplify Your Voice

    ·

    In the media, there is a stark gender gap. Not only are women in positions of power frequently the targets of sexist insults, but our voices are also disproportionately left out of important public conversations.

    Read More: mark bourrie

    Only 19% of news specialists are women, according to the Women’s Media Center. Less than 25% of OpEd writers are women. On Sunday talk programs, the average ratio of male to female guests is 4-to-1.

    The fact that many women do not present themselves as experts and take the effort to approach media outlets with their work is one of the elements that contributes to this imbalance. Women frequently think that in order to be seen as reliable media sources, they must have more education or expertise. They undervalue the importance of their expertise overall.

    Deciding that your voice matters is the first step towards sharing your skills. You have the ability to lead with compassion and as a cultural healer, influencing the dialogues that bring about change and increase awareness. These pointers can help you establish yourself as a media expert if you are prepared to speak up on the topics that really matter and accept the truth about your power and worth:

    1. What area of expertise do you possess?

    Limit it to a single, distinct subject. Now give three arguments for your subject-matter competence. Pay attention to the most impressive accomplishments and credibility elements. What would the chyron beside your name read if you were on television tonight? Give us a brief summary of who you are. It might be as easy as putting the word expert after your topic.

    2. Which organizations do you belong to?

    Join organizations that are relevant to you. Alternatively, make your own. New projects always pique the curiosity of media outlets. Remember that activism may be a route to knowledge as well. Invest time with groups who share your enthusiasm for the same problems. Make connections and show initiative to assume a leadership role.

    3. Express yourself!

    Make a free speaking offer to your neighborhood. Locate non-profits, businesses, or business associations in your area, and explain to them how your presentation may help their employees or clientele. Take a video of yourself and utilize the experience to get more employment. Don’t forget to request recommendations for more possible places. One step in developing a paid speaking career is to do this.

    4. Write about your areas of expertise.

    Launch a blog with an emphasis on your particular niche. Alternatively, ask a member of your network whether you may submit a guest article. With an issue-focused blog, you may begin modestly and work your way up to greater prominence. Reach out to bloggers and offer yourself as a source. You can approach more prestigious websites and submit an article once you’ve gained some experience and writing examples. To establish your media brand and boost your reputation, provide links to your pieces on your website.

    5. Create a list of regional media outlets.

    Find out what local reporters cover and who covers it. Establish connections with journalists who are curious about your area of expertise. Accessing local and regional news sources is typically simpler. By doing this, you will get the credibility you need to finally contact national news forums. Speaking on a tiny online radio program or for local newspapers will help you gain composure and confidence.

    6. Construct a compelling pitch.

    Select a hot topic for current events in your industry. Briefly summarize your argument, establish your credibility, and show yourself as an authority. Provide the reporter or producer with three succinct talking points to help them understand your message. Including a recent research, current affairs, or human interest component is beneficial. In your pitch, respond to the following queries: Why you? Why this time? What now? Make it very evident what is at risk. Don’t forget to set yourself apart from other coverage by saying something like, “The New York Times covered this, but here’s what they didn’t cover.”

    7. Use social media to build genuine communities.

    Create a Facebook profile of your own and connect with other online advocates for the same cause. People are not interested in being sold anything. They desire to participate in and add to an insightful conversation. Promote more than just yourself. Provide your followers with insightful and timely material, and concentrate on how you can motivate the entire community to take up your chosen cause.

    8. Look for media leads from sources.

    Make an application for a be included in an expert database like ExpertClick or SheSource. You may create and distribute your own news releases using PR Web. PR Leads provides a monthly membership service that allows requests from journalists and media outlets to be forwarded to your email address. The OpEd Project offers advice and training for writing comments, and Help A Reporter Out (HARO) is a free resource for locating leads that are urgent.

    Try to rediscover your reasons for being enthusiastic about your chosen subject if you are feeling afraid or resistant to approaching the media. You will notice results if you make a commitment to building your media platform one step at a time.

    Remain tenacious. You are worthy of being acknowledged.

    “When I dare to be powerful, to use my strength in service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid,” feminist author Audre Lorde once stated.

  • How to become the ultimate team player

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    Collaboration is the foundation of teamwork. What are the advantages of teamwork, and how can one develop excellent teamwork skills?

    Read More: anson funds

    It is common sense to us that collaborating with others is beneficial. However, why is it so crucial, and what does effective cooperation and collaboration actually look like? Here’s how to start improving your teamwork abilities.

    What does it mean to collaborate with others?

    When individuals discuss having the capacity to collaborate with others, they are typically referring to a set of “soft skills” that allow you to work together on a project and establish fruitful working connections. How does this appear, then?

    Working well with others is defined by the Nebraska University of Law as:

    The ability to communicate clearly, work together, cooperate, and resolve problems with others in order to complete tasks

    Recognizing the cultural background of the individuals you engage with, such as clients and coworkers

    Making choices both alone and collaboratively

    voicing one’s thoughts and honoring those of others

    Being adaptable

    How about we define teamwork?

    Teamwork and collaboration are inextricably related. The definition given by the Merriam-Webster dictionary is: “Work done by several associates with each doing a part but all subordinating personal prominence to the efficiency of the whole.”

    According to this concept, cooperation emphasizes a common objective over each member’s drive for individual success by focusing our strengths towards it. Put another way, a team player prioritizes the goals of the group.

    Experts concur. Renowned social psychologist J. Richard Hackman is credited with developing a five-factor model for team success that describes the attributes and circumstances necessary for productive group work.

    Is the group a true team with well-defined roles, mutual reliance, and long-term membership stability?

    Does the team have a well-defined goal that is both difficult and significant? Does it prioritize goals over means?

    Does the task, makeup, and fundamental rules of behavior of the team promote or hinder teamwork?

    Is there a robust social network and communication within the team that facilitates teamwork?

    Is there qualified coaching available to assist members in overcoming obstacles and seizing new opportunities? Is coaching given when participants are best prepared to accept and use it?

    What makes collaborating with others so crucial?

    Sometimes it seems as though interpersonal skills are optional and that hard skills like degrees and certifications are more significant than interpersonal skills.

    Soft skills, however, are essential for success. A study conducted by Queens University of Charlotte found that 73% of senior executives felt that soft skills were more essential than job-specific abilities, and 44% of them said that soft skills made up the majority of the US skills gap.

    Nearly 75% of employers in the same survey said that cooperation and teamwork were “very important.” But just 18% of workers receive feedback on their teamwork in their performance reports.

    Professional connections are important for reasons beyond simply making our lives better. Gallup uses the question “do you have a best friend at work?” as part of their approach to gauge effective management, which includes assessing relationships at work.

    Success indicators often rise when the response is in the affirmative. Women who firmly think that they have a best friend at work are more than twice as likely to be engaged workers (63%) as are those who disagree (29%), according to a Gallup poll.

    Collaboration is more crucial than ever in the modern workplace, where we spend more time together than ever before. Additionally, organizations will need to identify procedures and resources that can facilitate efficient business collaboration and communication as the need for remote team-building and bridging office-based positions with frontline or desk-less workers grows.